Carp Rods

Showing 1 to 12 of 246 total

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Showing 1 to 12 of 246 total

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Catching a monster carp comes unparalleled for many anglers in the UK. You can carp fish with a pole but carp fishing with a rod and reel is overwhelmingly more popular. A carp fishing rod setup allows you to cast out three or four carp rigs into one swim and with bite alarms, you can fish throughout the night whilst resting in your bivvy. Whether you prefer a quick overnighter or you enjoy longer session carp fishing, a top-quality rod for carp fishing success.

The length of most carp rods is 12ft as it offers you a mix of casting ability and fish playing potential – allowing you to tackle any swim with complete confidence. It also perfectly complements most landing nets, which tend to have handles of approximately 6ft. If you’re fishing on a variety of venues, with standard water heights and snag zones, then a 12ft rod will be ideal for your needs. However, we do also stock longer 13ft rods, which are ideal for tackling the largest carp waters, offering long-distance casting. Many 12ft rods will often be fitted with 40mm butt rings, whereas 13ft rods will be fitted with 50mm rings. The larger the butt ring is, the less friction a line will experience.

Both 12ft and 13ft rods are available in a range of test curve options which refers to the weight required in order to bend the rod tip at a 90-degree angle to the butt. Most carp rods offer test curves between 2.75lbs and 3.5lbs and your choice should reflect the kinds of waters that you fish and the size of the carp that you’re targeting. If you’re fishing fast-flowing waters, with a heavy rig, or for large carp, then you’ll want to go for a rod with a heavier test curve. However, if you’re fishing still waters, with lighter terminal tackle, or for smaller carp then a lower test curve will suffice.

The action of the rod will be determined by a combination of the test curve and the materials at use in the rod blank (body of the rod). Carp rods have a variety of different rod actions, from fast action rods to through action rods, and a popular choice of parabolic action (progressive action). This offers a mix of fast and through action offering a responsive tip action and a powerful butt section. Most top-end rods will offer a high modulus carbon fibre blank with a stiffness rating alluding to the performance of the rod when under high-rotational pressure (or torque). Rods on the cheaper end of the spectrum will often use a carbon composite, rather than pure carbon fibre, in order to achieve the desired action.

The handle of the rod is traditionally made from cork which offers heat retention and great grip in wet conditions. However, some modern rods feature EVA handles which are a plastic composite material which is lightweight, easy to clean and offers an ergonomic hold on your rod. Your rod handle will be finished with a butt cap, which is designed to protect the blank from damage, as well as boast the brand name.

The furnishings of a carp rod such as the line guides and your reel seat, provide a pathway for your fishing line to run along during your cast and retrieve and security for your carp reel.  You’ll find that some rods will offer low-friction or low-abrasion guides which are designed to accommodate all line types, including monofilament line and braided line. The reel seat is commonly in the DPS style or Fuji.

Bonus features on carp rods include line clips, hook keeper rings, and isotope slots, for inserting isotopes into the tip section of your rod during low light level angling. When it comes to high-performance carp fishing rods, Harrison rods and Century rods dominate the upper end of the price bracket. Some brands will produce rods across the price spectrum, including the likes of Daiwa, Shimano, and Fox. Shakespeare rods are loved by beginners and budget anglers alike, as are Wychwood rods.

When you’re looking to complete that trendy three carp rods set up, you might also want to consider a spod or marker rod. Spod rods have a higher test curve than traditional carp rods as they are designed to cast out heavy weighted spods of bait. Marker rods often have a stronger test curve than traditional carp rods and gives you somewhere to aim when you’re casting into open water.