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Dave Coster How To- Get Out Of Trouble With Sweetcorn

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Dave Coster How To- Get Out Of Trouble With Sweetcorn

Sweetcorn can be useful to have in reserve for those occasions when small fish are driving you mad, constantly whittling away at baits like maggots, casters and worms. When using feeder tackle in particular and fishing for bream, small perch can be a big nuisance, eagerly attacking any lively hook baits you try. This is the time to introduce some sweetcorn into your bait menu, which is why it’s always a good idea to have a couple of spare tins in your carryall. Some anglers don’t like using this bait because it’s sticky and gets your reel and rod handle in a mess after constant handling, but this won’t happen if you keep the bait stored in water - in a shallow bait box.

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Sweetcorn is a versatile feed that can be used successfully with several types of swim feeders and in combination with quite a few different baits. A good method for carp is to use it on the hook when using a pellet feeder. Very often it will pull lots of bites when feeding micro pellets. Sweetcorn is a great bait to add to groundbait mixes too when using open-end feeders, alongside casters and chopped worms. A relatively new area where sweetcorn is scoring brilliantly is with window feeders, fished at long range. If you cram a window feeder with sweetcorn and seal it in with a dab of groundbait, fish like big bream and tench are likely to respond.

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If you can’t decide which type of feeder is best to use, attach your first-choice model via a free-running feeder bead. This has a snap link that allows feeder sizes or designs to be changed without having to dismantle the rig. This feature can be particularly useful if the wind gets up, allowing you to switch from a traditional open-end feeder to a longer casting base weight model. Another good trick when using directly hooked sweetcorn in deeper water, is to only hook slim half grains that have been cut short. These won’t spin up your hook length line like full grains of ‘corn, which spin like helicopter blades as they fall through the water.
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